PROGRAMS FOR CHILDREN AT UCM

Our children’s Religious Education (RE) program provides a vibrant and nurturing community that encourages children in grades Pre-K – 5 to grow in spirit, connection and justice-seeking.
In addition to a regular Sunday program there are a variety of special events held throughout the year..

Your Children are Welcome at UCM

At the Unitarian Congregation in Mississauga, our programs for children strive to

  • honour our children’s natural sense of wonder
  • teach about the beliefs and practices of the world’s religions
  • foster respect for diversity
  • inspire children and youth to act for social justice, the environment and inclusivity within a supportive community

During our Sunday morning worship service we offer loving care for toddlers and engaging programming for pre-school and school-age children. The children & youth programming at UCM is known as Spiritual Exploration (SE).

Our team of carefully chosen volunteer teachers help the children explore our 8 principles through the use of story, discussion, crafts, cooperative games, and activities to create a fun, interactive experience for young people.

In addition to a regular Sunday program there are a variety of special events held throughout the year.

To register your children in the Spiritual education program at the Unitarian Congregation in Mississauga, email Caitlyn.



The 8 Principles of Children Programs at UCM

At the Unitarian Congregation in Mississauga, our programs are grounded in the Unitarian 8 Principles and use our monthly congregation theme as a lens through which to promote a sense of social justice, tolerance, identity, and spiritual growth. Our purpose is to involve children and youth in a community in which they develop a deep spiritual connection to themselves, others, and the world as a whole. We seek an outcome of respectful, responsible, life-loving kids who know they are valued for all of who they are and are ready to show others the same deep love and acceptance.

  • Honour your children’s natural curiosity and sense of wonder
  • Familiarize your children with our Unitarian Universalist heritage and values and with the beliefs and practices of the world’s religions
  • Encourage children’s appreciation for our shared humanity and respect for the diversity of opinion, ability, affectional orientation and ethnicity among us
  • Foster children’s sense of connectedness to the extended spiritual family in our congregation and support parents in a community of like-minded individuals
  • Inspire children and youth to act for justice, equity and compassion

To register your children in the Spiritual education program at the Unitarian Congregation in Mississauga, email Caitlyn.

UCM and Your School-Aged Children

Parents and caregivers come to the Unitarian Congregation in Mississauga for a community that help raise children to become

  • kind
  • respectful
  • fair-minded
  • caring
  • strong enough to side with love and fight for justice.

UCM religious education and participation in worship, social justice work, and multigenerational gatherings reinforce what parents teach at home. We nurture truth-seeking, spirituality, and progressive moral values that will continue to shape and support our children as they grow. Children from grades 4 – 6 can choose to participate in our Whole Lives Program.

The Unitarian Congregation in Mississauga children’s programs build resilience, offering support through life’s tough times and encouraging each child to connect with their own quest for purpose and meaning. Kids learn respect for others and respect for themselves. They experience spiritual practices and learn ways to center themselves, whether by sitting cross-legged and taking a few deep breaths, giving thanks before they eat a meal, or looking up at the stars in wonder. Our programs create peer connections that break the patterns of a school or neighborhood social scene, allowing children to build genuine friendships across differences.

UCM Unitarian spiritual education is goal-oriented in one way: UCM kids take their Unitarian values out into the world with them.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

UCM and Your Toddler

We know that parents of young children need a spirit break.  At our regular Sunday morning services, children join their families for the welcoming, chalice lighting and a story for all ages.  Children may opt to stay with their parents in the children’s nook or can visit the nursery were they can spend approximately 45 minutes in the care of loving and friendly caregivers before being pick up in time for Fellowship Hour.

To register your children in the Spiritual education program at the Unitarian Congregation in Mississauga, email Caitlyn.

Special Events at UCM

The Unitarian Congregation in Mississauga holds a variety of all ages special events throughout the year:

  • family Movie Nights
  • our annual Halloween Party featuring the “Haunted Barn”
  • our Winter Dinner
  • our February Mad Hatter’s Tea Party
  • our June Picnic

UCM kids take their UU values out into the world with them, they get involved and do good in the community:

  • mitten tree: our annual December hat, mitten, and scarf drive for those in need.

Check the calendar for more information.


More Time For All Ages

This Sunday (March 10th) is a story called Just the Way You Are by Max Lucado.

The resources below focus on principle 1. I encourage parents and/or guardians to review.

Principle 1: The inherent worth and dignity of every person

Principle 1 in Simpler Language: Everyone is important

Principle 1 in French: La valeur et la dignité intrinsèques de toute personne

– Children: The Fountain of Youth from Korean Folk & Fairy Tales by Suzanne Crowder Han (Story)
– Junior Youth and Youth: A Litany of Wholeheartedness (Reading)
– Young Adults and Adults: A Person Is a Puzzle (Reading)
– Families: In relation to the theme of the service, Cindy Tsai, MD says “In theory, perfectionism sounds like a good thing. Who doesn’t want to do and be their best? It can even seem like a harmless way to motivate yourself. But the reality is, nothing is perfect. What does “perfect” even mean? What does it look like? Who has the instruction manual?” Each person is encouraged to reflect on activities or areas in which they feel they may be lacking. Think about small actions that can be done gradually to improve and meet your goals. (Activity)

This Sunday (February 11th) is a Hindu creation hymn called Vedic Creation Hymn (Rig Veda Book 10, Hymn 129) and explanation.

As the Lunar New Year celebration also started this weekend on February 10th, I encourage parents and/or guardians to continue to learn about other cultures with their families through the below resources:

– Children: The Story of Lunar New Year (Video)
– Junior Youth and Youth: Lunar New Year (Instagram Comic)
– Young Adults and Adults: A Traveller’s Guide to Tet Holiday (Reading)
– Families: One tradition of Lunar New Year is to give lucky money or lì xì as a wish of luck and good things to happen to them in the new year in red envelopes. You are encouraged to make your own red envelope using these instructions. Give your red envelope to someone else in your family and remember to always use both hands when receiving. (Activity)

This Sunday (February 4th) is a story called The Path by Bob Staake.

The discussion questions below focus on principle 3. I encourage parents and/or guardians to discuss these questions and share their answers with their families.

Principle 1: Acceptance of one another and encouragement to spiritual growth in our congregations

Principle 1 for Children: Everyone should accept one another and keep learning together

Principle 1 in French: L’acceptation mutuelle et l’encouragement à la croissance spirituelle au sein de nos assemblées

1) What does the word spiritual mean to you?

2) Does the meaning of the word spiritual only happen on Sundays at the congregation or in your everyday life?

Below are some additional resources focusing on similar themes:

– Children: Deep in the Sahara (Story)
– Junior Youth and Youth: Life is a Highway (Song)
– Young Adults and Adults: Company on the Path to Inner Truth (Reading)
– Families: Each person is encouraged to illustrate principle 3 through pictures and/or short phrases. (Tapestry of Faith Activity)

This Sunday (January 28th) is a story called Intersection Allies: we make room for all by Chelsea Johnson, LaToya Council, and Carolyn Choi.

The resources below focus on principle 1. I encourage parents and/or guardians to review.

Principle 1: The inherent worth and dignity of every person

Principle 1 for Children: Everyone is important

Principle 1 in French: La valeur et la dignité intrinsèques de toute personne

– Children: All Are Welcome by Alexandra Penfold & Suzanne Kaufman (Story)
– Junior Youth and Youth: Love Holds You (Reading)
– Young Adults and Adults: Enoughness (Reading)
– Families: Each person is encouraged to revisit their illustration of principle 1 and decide if they want to change it through pictures and/or short phrases. (Tapestry of Faith Activity)

This Sunday (January 21st) is a story called The Heart and the Bottle by Oliver Jeffers.

The discussion questions below focus on principle 1. I encourage parents and/or guardians to discuss these questions and share their answers with their families.

Principle 1: The inherent worth and dignity of every person

Principle 1 for Children: Everyone is important

Principle 1 in French: La valeur et la dignité intrinsèques de toute personne

1) Think of someone important to you, why are they important to you?

2) How do you know someone or something is important to you?

Below are some additional resources focusing on similar themes:

– Children: The Path: A Picture Book About Finding Your Own True Way (Story)
– Junior Youth and Youth: Remembering Self-Worth (Reflection)
– Young Adults and Adults: In-betweenness (Meditation)
– Families: Each person is encouraged to illustrate principle 1 through pictures and/or short phrases. (Tapestry of Faith Activity)

This Sunday (January 14th) is a story called Flame of Learning, Chalice of Love by Janeen K Grohsmeyer

The discussion questions below focus on the chalice and rituals. I encourage parents and/or guardians to discuss these questions and share their answers with their families.

1) Do you light a chalice before doing any spiritual practices or rituals at home? Why or why not?
2) What does the lighting of the chalice mean to you?
3) What does the extinguishing of the chalice mean to you?

Below are some additional resources focusing on similar themes:

Children: Circles of Light: A Flaming Chalice (Story)
Junior Youth and Youth: Lean on Me (Song)
Young Adults and Adults: You are encouraged to reflect on the question: How can (or how does) using the chalice in my personal and/or communal worship enhance my spiritual journey? (Activity)
Families: Together, use the My Faith Symbol handout to draw the shape of a chalice that best represents you and fill in on the lines what the chalice means to you and when you use it. (Tapestry of Faith Activity)

This Sunday (November 26th) is the Canadian Unitarian Council’s (CUC) National Worship Sunday Service focusing on Reemerging, Reimagining, & Renewal.

Below are some resources focusing on similar themes:

  • Children: The Day You Begin (Story)
  • Junior Youth and Youth: I Gave Everything (Song)
  • Young Adults Adults: Cathedral of the World (Reading)
  • Families: Read this short passage called A Painter’s Creative Process. Reflect with your family about the following questions: What goals/dreams do you have for this year or in the long-term? How do you focus on achieving these goals/dreams in your daily life? What activities/hobbies/practices help you to feel renewed, fulfilled, or happy when your journey to your goals and dreams is not going the way you expected?

This Sunday (November 19th), the story is being replaced by an adapted UU Principles song.

The discussion questions below focus on principles 2, 3, and 8. I encourage parents and/or guardians to discuss these questions and share their answers with their families.

Principle 2: Justice, equity, and compassion in human relations/Everyone should be treated fairly and kindly
Principle 3: Acceptance of one another and encouragement to spiritual growth in our congregations/We should accept one another and keep learning together
Principle 8: Individual and communal action that accountably dismantles racism and systemic barriers to full inclusion in ourselves and our institutions/We must work together for diversity and against racism and oppression

  1. Which principle speaks to you the most?
  2. How do you live the principles and sources in your daily life?
  3. Which principles and sources do you pay little or no attention to?

Below are some additional resources focusing on similar themes:

  • Children: The Wandering Teacher (Story)
  • Junior Youth: Reflect on the following questions – what does the word creed mean to you? Do you have a creed? How does UUism impact your creed?
  • Youth and Young Adults: CanUUdle and Chorus Coordinators (CUC Event)
  • Adults: Reflect on your creed and think if it has changed since you last actively thought about it.
  • Families: Reflect with your family about the following questions: Is there value in memorizing and knowing the principles by heart? Can we live them if we do not know what they are?

This Sunday (November 12th), the story is called It’s Okay to Be Different by Todd Parr.

The discussion questions below focus on principles 2, 3, and 8. I encourage parents and/or guardians to discuss these questions and share their answers with their families.

Principle 2: Justice, equity, and compassion in human relations/Everyone should be treated fairly and kindly
Principle 3: Acceptance of one another and encouragement to spiritual growth in our congregations/We should accept one another and keep learning together
Principle 8: Individual and communal action that accountably dismantles racism and systemic barriers to full inclusion in ourselves and our institutions/We must work together for diversity and against racism and oppression

  1. How do you realize you or others are different?
  2. How does it make you feel to be different if you want to be part of a group/community?
  3. How do you include others in your groups/communities?

Below are some additional resources focusing on similar themes:

This Sunday (Oct 29th), there are two stories: Why Death is Like the Banana Tree and The Brothers.

I encourage parents and/or guardians to keep in mind principles 1, 3, and 7 while engaging with the below questions and resources:
Principle 1: The inherent worth and dignity of every person/Everyone is important
Principle 3: Acceptance of one another and encouragement to spiritual growth in our congregations/We should accept one another and keep learning together
Principle 7: Respect for the interdependent web of all existence of which we are a part/ We believe in caring for our planet Earth, the home that we share with all living things

  1. Where do you think people or pets go when they die?
  2. Have you ever lost someone or something that was important to you? How did you feel?

– Children: The Goodbye Book (Story)
– Junior Youth: The Memory Box (Story)
– Youth & Young Adults: See You Again (Music)
– Adults: Prayer for Hopelessness (Poem)
– Families: Give someone you care about a hug and brainstorm some habits or rituals you currently do or want to start doing in your daily life to be fully present in your time with the people you care about. (Activity)

This Sunday (Oct 22nd), the story is Wherever You Go by Pat Zietlow Miller.

I encourage parents and/or guardians to keep in mind principles 1, 2, and 3 while engaging with the below questions and resources:
Principle 1: The inherent worth and dignity of every person/Everyone is important
Principle 2: Justice, equity, and compassion in human relations/Everyone should be treated fairly and kindly
Principle 3: Acceptance of one another and encouragement to spiritual growth in our congregations/We should accept one another and keep learning together

  1. How would you describe your experience with this religious community?
  2. Where do you feel you are on your spiritual journey?

– Children: The Little Engine That Could (Story)
– Junior Youth & Youth: Stanley Parable Text Adventure (Online Game)
– Young Adults & Adults: Our Journey is to Transform (Reading)
– Families: Get a blank piece of paper and take turns writing wondering questions that you think religion could help to answer anywhere on the paper. A “wondering question” is one that inspires investigation and discovery-“seeking truth in love”. Such questions may not be readily answerable, and certainly not with a simple “yes” or “no”. Ex. why we are here? (Tapestry of Faith Activity)

This Sunday (Oct 15th), the story is The End is Just the Beginning by Mike Bender.

I encourage parents and/or guardians to keep in mind principles 1, 3, and 4 while engaging with the below questions and resources:
Principle 1: The inherent worth and dignity of every person/Everyone is important
Principle 3: Acceptance of one another and encouragement to spiritual growth in our congregations/We should accept one another and keep learning together
Principle 4: A free and responsible search for truth and meaning/ Each person must be free to search for what is true and right in life

  1. How would you describe your experience with religion?
  2. How is being UU similar or different to other religions?

– Children: The Day You Begin (Story)
– Junior Youth & Youth: Take What You Need and Leave the Rest Behind (Reading)
– Young Adults & Adults: A True Story (Reading)
– Families: Brainstorm what you have learned on your journey with religion and with this UU community. (Activity)

This Sunday (Oct 8th), the story is When You Have More Than Enough by Dawn Star Sarahs-Borchelt.

I encourage parents and/or guardians to keep in mind principles 1, 2, and 8 while engaging with the below questions and resources:
Principle 1: The inherent worth and dignity of every person/Everyone is important
Principle 2: Justice, equity, and compassion in human relations/ Everyone should be treated fairly and kindly
Principle 8: Individual and communal action that accountably dismantles racism and systemic barriers to full inclusion in ourselves and our institutions/ Everyone must work together for diversity and against racism & oppression

  1. Who in your life is someone that you would consider a generous person? What makes them that way?
  2. How do you feel when you are generous to others? To yourself?
  3. Do you usually think you have more than you need, less than you need, or exactly what you need?
  • Children: The Best Meal (Story)
  • Junior Youth & Youth: Thankful (Music)
  • Young Adults & Adults: One way of increasing gratitude and generosity in a relationship is called Naikan. This reflective practice originated in twentieth-century Japan. It has roots in Buddhism and Eastern psychology. The word Naikan means “looking inside.” Its practice cultivates awareness of the self in relationship to others. Some questions to ponder are: What is the relationship between generosity and gratitude? What have I given and received from others? In what ways can generosity and gratitude get out of balance between myself and others? What are some ways in which I can address this imbalance? (Tapestry of Faith Reflection)

Families: Consider someone or people in your life today who would benefit from your generosity of time. How can you demonstrate generosity to or spend time with that person today or this week? (Activity)

This Sunday (Oct 1st), the story is Treasure Stones by Janeen K. Grohsmeyer.

I encourage parents and/or guardians to keep in mind principles 3 and 4 while engaging with the below questions and resources:
Principle 3: Acceptance of one another and encouragement to spiritual growth in our congregations/We should accept one another and keep learning together
Principle 4: A free and responsible search for truth and meaning/ Each person must be free to search for what is true and right in life.

  1. What do you want to do when you grow up?
  2. Have your dreams and goals changed over time? Why or why not?
  3. How do you feel as you try to reach your goals? Challenged, fulfilled, frustrated?

Families: Read the story, Journey of a Snowflake, and explore the Snowflake Safari before continuing the discussion of the faith journey (Tapestry of Faith Activity)

This Sunday (Sept 24th), the story is Whoever You Are by Mem Fox.

I encourage parents and/or guardians to keep in mind principles 1 and 3 while engaging with the below questions and resources:

  • Principle 1: The inherent worth and dignity of every person/ Everyone is important
  • Principle 3: Acceptance of one another and encouragement to spiritual growth in our congregations/We should accept one another and keep learning together
    1. What’s one adjective/word you would use to describe yourself?
    2. How do you show other people they are important to you?
    3. Is the way you show people they are important to you different from the way you show you accept others? Why or why not?
  • Children: Tomorrow I’ll Be Brave (Story)
  • Junior Youth & Youth: Making Moral Compasses (Activity)
  • Young Adults & Adults: Who, outside your family, do you think is a good advisor? (Reflection)
  • Families: Talk each day about the right and wrong you have experienced. Did you each do something good you want to share? Is there somebody in the family you want to thank for a virtuous act? Is there something you wish you had not done that you need to talk about? How can you make tomorrow a better day? (Tapestry of Faith Activity)

This Sunday (September 17th), the story is called Can You Say Peace? by Karen Katz.
I encourage parents and/or guardians to keep in mind principle 6 while engaging with the below questions and resources:

Principle 6: The goal of world community with peace, liberty, and justice for all/We believe in working for a peaceful, fair, and free world

  1. Remember a time when you felt peaceful, what were you doing?
  2. What does peace mean to you?
  3. Do you think peace has the same meaning no matter what language it is spoken in?

This Sunday (September 10th), the story is called “On the Other Side of the River.”
I encourage parents and/or guardians to keep in mind principles 2 and 3 while engaging with the below questions and resources:

Principle 2: Justice, equity, and compassion in human relations/Everyone should be treated fairly and kindly
Principle 7: Respect for the interdependent web of all existence of which we are a part/We must care for what we share with all living things

  1. How does your family resolve conflicts?
  2. Do you resolve your conflicts with your friends in the same way as your family?
  • Children: The Water Bearer’s Garden (Story)
  • Junior Youth and Youth: All Water is One Water (Reading)
  • Young Adults and Adults: Water Rituals and Ingatherings, Revitalized (Reading)
  • Families: Go on a family adventure to a river or creek. How has the river shaped the environment around it? What does the power of the water feel like when you put your hand in it? What does the power of the water feel like if you actually step out into the flow? How does the power of the water carry a stick or another floating object? (Tapestry of Faith Activity)

Caitlyn Seale, Family Life Coordinator

This Sunday (June 18th) the Time for All Ages is a story called My Two Dads and Me by Michael Joosten. The author also has story called My Two Moms and Me.

I encourage parents and/or guardians to keep in mind principles 1 and 8 while engaging with the below resources:
Principle 1: The inherent worth and dignity of every person/Everyone is important
Principle 8: ​ Individual and communal action that accountably dismantles racism and systemic barriers to full inclusion in ourselves and our institutions/We must work together for diversity and against racism and oppression

This Sunday (June 11th) the Time for All Ages is a story called The Magic Garden of the Poor.

I encourage parents and/or guardians to keep in mind principles 2 and 7 while engaging with the below resources:
Principle 2: Justice, equity, and compassion in human relations/Everyone should be treated fairly and kindly
Principle 7: ​ Respect for the interdependent web of all existence of which we are a part/We must care for our planet Earth, the home we share with all living things
Below are some additional resources focusing on similar themes:

This Sunday (June 4th) the Time for All Ages is a story called I am Courage by Susan Verde.

 The story includes a powerful author’s note:
“Often when we think of someone brave, we think of one who is without fear, boldly slaying dragons or moving through the world conquering every obstacle in their way. It may look on the outside like things come easy for some, that they are never afraid. But that isn’t what’s true. Although what scares each of us may be different, fear is something we all feel, and we don’t need to hide it. It is okay to talk about. Bravery isn’t fearlessness; real courage comes from being afraid and still facing what challenges you, whether that means asking for help, sharing your truth, or slaying a dragon. Once you rule out danger, fear is a place for opportunity and growth. I am Courage is a story about how to find courage within ourselves when we feel afraid or unable. It’s about the ways in which we are rave every day – and how we will fall down, but we all have the ability to get back up again and keep on going. We are all courageous.”

I encourage parents and/or guardians to keep in mind principles 3 and 6 while engaging with the below resources:
The discussion questions below focus on principles 3 and 7. I encourage parents and/or guardians to discuss these questions and share their answers with their families.
Principle 3: Acceptance of one another and encouragement to spiritual growth in our congregations/We should accept one another and keep learning together
Principle 6: ​ The goal of world community with peace, liberty, and justice for all/We must work for a peaceful, fair, and free world

  1. What does being brave or courageous mean to you?
  2. What worries or fears do you have?
  3. Who do you turn to for support?

Below are some additional resources focusing on similar themes:

This Sunday (May 28th) the Time for All Ages is a story called the Juniper Tree by the Brothers Grimm, chosen by Livia Antognini.

I encourage parents and/or guardians to keep in mind principle 1 while engaging with the below resources:
Principle 1: The inherent worth and dignity of every person/Everyone is important

This Sunday (May 14th) the Time for All Ages is a song called De Colores sung by Joan Baez and the lyrics.

I encourage parents and/or guardians to keep in mind principle 7 while engaging with the below resources:
Principle 7: Respect for the interdependent web of all existence of which we are a part/We must care for our planet Earth, the home we share with all living things

This Sunday (May 7th) the Time for All Ages is a story called My Many Colored Days by Dr. Seuss.

I encourage parents and/or guardians to keep in mind principles 1, 2, and 8 while engaging with the below resources:

Principle 1: The inherent worth and dignity of every person/Everyone is important
Principle 2: ​Justice, equity, and compassion in human relations/ Everyone should be treated fairly and kindly
Principle 8: Individual and communal action that accountably dismantles racism and systemic barriers to full inclusion in ourselves and our institutions/ We must work together for diversity and against racism & oppression

This Sunday (April 30th) the Time for All Ages is a story called ​A Place to Stay by Erin Gunti.

I encourage parents and/or guardians to keep in mind principles 2, 6, and 8 while engaging with the below resources:
Principle 2: ​Justice, equity, and compassion in human relations/ Everyone should be treated fairly and kindly
Principle 6: The goal of world community with peace, liberty, and justice for all/We must work for a peaceful, fair and free world
Principle 8: Individual and communal action that accountably dismantles racism and systemic barriers to full inclusion in ourselves and our institutions/ We must work together for diversity and against racism & oppression

This Sunday (April 16th) the Time for All Ages is a story called When the Wind Stops by Charlotte Zolotow.

As this Sunday is Fiona’s last service, the below resources will be focusing on themes of well wishes, change and transition:

This Sunday (April 9th) the Time for All Ages is a story called A Lamp in Every Corner by Janeen K. Grohsmeyer.

I encourage parents and/or guardians to keep principle 3 in mind as they engage with the below resources focusing on similar themes:
Principle 3: Acceptance of one another and encouragement to spiritual growth in our congregations/We should accept one another and keep learning together

This Sunday (April 2nd) the Time for All Ages is a story called Listening to My Body by Gabi Garcia.

The discussion questions below focus on principle 1. I encourage parents and/or guardians to keep this principle in mind while engaging with the below resources focusing on similar themes:
Principle 1: The inherent worth and dignity of every person/Everyone is important

This Sunday (March 26th) the Time for All Ages is an adapted version of a story called The Rebirth of the Sun from Circle Round by Starhawk, Diane Baker, and Anne Hill.

The discussion questions below focus on principle 7. I encourage parents and/or guardians to discuss these questions and share their answers with their families.
Principle 7: Respect for the interdependent web of all existence of which we are a part/We must care for our planet Earth, the home we share with all living things

  1. What are 2-3 things that remind you of spring?
  2. Is spring your favourite season? Why or why not?
  3. What is one thing you want to do differently this spring compared to last spring?

Below are some additional resources focusing on similar themes:

This Sunday (February 26th), the Time for All Ages is a story called Hold that Thought! by Bree Galbraith.

The discussion questions below focus on principle 3. I encourage parents and/or guardians to discuss these questions and share their answers with their families.

Principle 3: Acceptance of one another and encouragement to spiritual growth in our congregations/We should accept one another and keep learning together

  1. When you have ideas, who do you want to tell first? Why?
  2. How does exploring ideas make you feel?
  3. When you share your ideas with other people, what can people say to help you feel your idea is understood and/or supported? Not understood and/or not supported?

Below are some additional resources focusing on similar themes:

Note: The quiz and report above are United States-focused resources

This Sunday (February 26th), the Time for All Ages is a story called Change Sings by Amanda Gorman.

The discussion questions below focus on principle 1. I encourage parents and/or guardians to discuss these questions and share their answers with their families.

Principle 1: The inherent worth and dignity of every person/Everyone is important

  1. What hobbies do you enjoy?
  2. What do you imagine would make life better for yourself or others?
  3. How do you set or reach goals for yourself in a healthy way?

Below are some additional resources focusing on similar themes:

This Sunday (February 19th), the Time for All Ages is a story called The Farmer’s Legacy by Christy Olson and Jessica York.

I encourage parents and/or guardians to engage with the below resources focusing on similar themes and keep principles 1 and 7 in mind:
Principle 1: The inherent worth and dignity of every person/Everyone is important
Principle 7: Respect for the interdependent web of all existence of which we are a part/We must care for our planet Earth, the home we share with all living things

This Sunday (February 12th), the Time for All Ages is a story called We Are Better Together by Bill McKibben.

I encourage parents and/or guardians to engage with the below resources focusing on similar themes and keep principles 2 and 8 in mind:
Principle 5: The right of conscience and the use of the democratic process within our congregations and in society at large/Everyone should have a vote about the things that concern them
Principle 6: The goal of world community with peace, liberty, and justice for all/We must work for a peaceful, fair, and free world

This Sunday (January 29th), the Time for All Ages is a story called The Wandering Teacher by Erik Walter Wikstrom.

The discussion questions below focus on principles 3 and 4. I encourage parents and/or guardians to discuss these questions and share their answers with their families.

Principle 3: Acceptance of one another and encouragement to spiritual growth in our congregations/We should accept one another and keep learning together
Principle 4: A free and responsible search for truth and meaning/Everyone must be free to search for what is true and right in life

  1. What aspect of Unitarian Universalism or the Unitarian Congregation in Mississauga drew you in and why?
  2. Which principle speaks to you the most and why?
  3. How would you describe where you are on your spiritual journey?

Below are some additional resources focusing on similar themes:

This Sunday (January 22nd), the Time for All Ages is a story called How Coyote Stole Fire.

I encourage parents and/or guardians to engage with the below resources focusing on similar themes and keep principles 2 and 8 in mind:

Principle 2: Justice, equity, and compassion in human relations/Everyone should be treated fairly and kindly
Principle 8: Individual and communal action that accountably dismantles racism and systemic barriers to full inclusion in ourselves and our institutions/We must work together for diversity and against racism & oppression

This Sunday (January 15th), the Time for All Ages is a story called The Day You Begin by Jacqueline Woodson.

The discussion questions below focus on principles 1 and 2. I encourage parents and/or guardians to discuss these questions and share their answers with their families.
Principle 1: The inherent worth and dignity of every person/Everyone is important
Principle 2: Justice, equity, and compassion in human relations/Everyone should be treated fairly and kindly

  1. Do you have any fears or worries? If so, what are they?
  2. Who or what strategies do you rely on to help you cope with your fears?
  3. How can you tell when other people are worried or fearful?

Below are some additional resources focusing on similar themes:

This Sunday (January 8th), the Time for All Ages is a story called The Everything Seed by Carole Martignacco.

Below are some additional resources focusing on similar themes. I encourage families to view these resources while keeping principle 1 in mind.

Principle 7: Respect for the interdependent web of all existence of which we are a part/We must care for our planet Earth, the home we share with all living things

 

This Sunday (December 18th), the Time for All Ages is a story called Santa’s Husband by Daniel Kibblesmith.

Principle 1: The inherent worth and dignity of every person/Everyone is important

This Sunday (December 11th), the Time for All Ages is a story called Bonniema and Fredpas’ Big Family! by Shelley Adam.

The discussion questions below focus on principles 3 and 6. I encourage parents and/or guardians to discuss these questions and share their answers with their families.

Principle 3: Acceptance of one another and encouragement to spiritual growth in our congregations/We should accept one another and keep learning together
Principle 6: The goal of world community with peace, liberty, and justice for all/We must work for a peaceful, fair, and free world

  1. What is a social issue you know about or are interested in learning more about?
  2. What books featuring UU characters or written by UU authors have you read?

Below are some additional resources focusing on similar themes:

This Sunday (December 4th), the Time for All Ages is a story called The Color Monster: A Pop-up Book of Feelings by Anna Llenas.

The discussion questions below focus on principles 1 and 2. I encourage parents and/or guardians to discuss these questions and share their answers with their families.

Principle 1: The inherent worth and dignity of every person/Everyone is important
Principle 2: Justice, equity, and compassion in human relations/Everyone should be treated fairly and kindly

  1. Why is it important to understand how you are feeling?
  2. How easily can you tell how other people are feeling?
  3. Who or what do you rely on to help you understand your emotions?

Below are some additional resources focusing on similar themes:

This Sunday (November 27rd), the Time for All Ages is a story called “We Are All One” from Stories in Faith by Gail Forsyth-Vail

Below are some additional resources focusing on similar themes. I encourage families to view these resources while keeping principle 7 in mind.

Principle 7: Respect for the interdependent web of all existence of which we are a part

This Sunday (November 13th), the Time for All Ages is a story called The Grumpy Gecko in the Barefoot Book of Earth Tales by Dawn Casey and Anne Wilson.

The discussion questions below focus on principles 6 and 7. I encourage parents and/or guardians to discuss these questions and share their answers with their families.
Principle 6: The goal of world community with peace, liberty, and justice for all/We must work for a peaceful, fair, and free world
Principle 7: Respect for the interdependent web of all existence of which we are a part/We must care for our planet Earth, the home we share with all living things
The Grumpy Gecko saw how he was connected to and depended on many living things in the jungle. He saw how he fit into a small part of interdependent web of life.

  1. Can you think of something living in nature that you are connected to and depend on?
  2. How about something not living in nature?
  3. Is it important to know about nature if we want to protect the web of life? Why or why not?

Below are some additional resources focusing on similar themes:

This Sunday (November 6th), the Time for All Ages is a story called Stone Soup by Jon J. Muth.

The discussion questions below focus on principles 6 and 7. I encourage parents and/or guardians to discuss these questions and share their answers with their families.

Principle 6: The goal of world community with peace, liberty, and justice for all/We must work for a peaceful, fair, and free world

Principle 7: Respect for the interdependent web of all existence of which we are a part/We must care for our planet Earth, the home we share with all living things

  • What does generosity mean to you?
  • When you are generous, what do you hope to happen?

Below are some additional resources focusing on similar themes:

This Sunday (October 30th), the Time for All Ages is a story called The End is Just the Beginning by Mike Bender.

The discussion questions below focus on principle 2. I encourage parents and/or guardians to discuss these questions and share their answers with their families.
Principle 2: Justice, equity, and compassion in human relations/Everyone should be treated fairly and kindly

  1. Do you believe endings such as the changing of seasons, the end of a day, reaching a goal, losing a relationship, etc. are final? Why or why not?
  2. How do you feel when you experience endings?
  3. Do you reach out to others for support as you make transitions? Why or why not?

Below are some additional resources focusing on similar themes:

Young Adults and Adults: Finding Peace, Calm, and Clarity (Guided Meditation)

This Sunday (October 23rd), the Time for All Ages is a story called Higgins: A Drop with a Dream By Christopher Buice.

The discussion questions below focus on principle 6. I encourage parents and/or guardians to discuss these questions and share their answers with their families.

Principle 6: The goal of world community with peace, liberty, and justice for all/We must work for a peaceful, fair, and free world

  • Have you ever felt like your actions were too small to make a difference?
  • Did you continue to act on your own, find similar-minded groups, or take another approach? Why or why not?

Below are some additional resources focusing on similar themes:

This Sunday (October 16th), the Time for All Ages is a story called It’s Okay to Be Different by Todd Parr.

The discussion questions below focus on principles 2, 3, and 8. I encourage parents and/or guardians to discuss these questions and share their answers with their families.

Principle 2: Justice, equity, and compassion in human relations/Everyone should be treated fairly and kindly

Principle 3: Acceptance of one another and encouragement to spiritual growth in our congregations/We should accept one another and keep learning together

Principle 8: Individual and communal action that accountably dismantles racism and systemic barriers to full inclusion in ourselves and our institutions/We must work together for diversity and against racism and oppression

  • How do you realize you or others are different?
  • How does it make you feel to be different if you want to be part of a group/community?
  • How do you include others in your groups/communities?

Below are some additional resources focusing on similar themes:

This Sunday (October 9th), the Time for All Ages is a prayer called We Are Still Grateful by Connie Simon.

Below are some additional resources focusing on similar themes. I encourage families to view these resources while keeping principle 7 in mind.
Principle 7: Respect for the interdependent web of all existence of which we are a part/We must care for our planet Earth, the home we share with all living things

This Sunday (October 2nd), the story is A Flock of Birds in Wisdom Tales from Around the World by Heather Forest.

Below are some additional resources focusing on similar themes.I encourage families to view these resources while keeping principle 7 in mind.

Principle 7: Respect for the interdependent web of all existence of which we are a part

– Children and Junior Youth: Active Listening (Video)
– Youth, Young Adults, and Adults: Meyers-Briggs Personality Test (Quiz)

This Sunday (September 25th), the story is The Dream Machine by Cherise Wyneken.

The discussion questions below focus on principle 4. I encourage parents and/or guardians to share these questions with their families.

Principle 4: A free and responsible search for truth and meaning/Everyone must be free to search for what is true and right in life

1) Who or where do you go when you are looking for the answer to an important question?

2) How do you figure out what is true and right among multiple sources of information?

3) What type of information is most convincing to you? Numbers, personal stories, celebrities, etc?

Below are some additional resources focusing on similar themes.

  • Children: Dreamcatcher by Audrey Osofsk (Story and Activity)

Note: there is use of the words Native American rather than Indigenous in the above



The inherent worth and dignity of every person

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Unitarian Congregation in Mississauga
84 South Service Road
Mississauga, ON
905-278-5622
info@uucm.ca